Women in Psychology (Mary Whiton Calkins)

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By Cochino1977
Words 1462
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Mary Whiton Calkins (1863-1930) was a great American philosopher and psychologist of the late 19th century and early 20th century. Mary Whiton Calkins was born on March 30th, 1863 in the city of Hartford in Connecticut. Mary was the eldest of five other siblings. Her father was Presbyterian minister named Wolcott Calkins. Mary’s family was close knit; Mary was especially close to her mother. In 1880 at the age of seventeen, Mary relocated to Newton, Massachusetts. Her family constructed a new home in Newton and Mary would actually live out the rest of her life in that home. Her father, aware of the substandard education available to women of that time period took it upon himself to educate Mary himself. In 1882 through the education Mary received from her father she was able to gain acceptance into Smith College with an advanced standing as a sophomore. In the year 1883 tragedy struck Mary’s life with the death of her sister Maude. The death of Maude permanently changed Mary’s thinking and her character. She dropped out of Smith College the following year and took private lessons at home. In the autumn of 1884 Mary reentered Smith College as a senior and graduated with a degree in philosophy with a concentration in classics. In the year 1886 Mary and her family traveled to Europe for 16 months. In Europe Mary expanded her knowledge of classic philosophy. When Mary returned to Massachusetts he father arranged a meeting for her to meet the President of Wellesley College, Wellesley College is a liberal arts college for women that was located close to her home. Mary was offered an opportunity to tutor in Greek and she began teaching at Wellesley College in the fall of 1887. Mary continued to teach in the Greek Department at Wellesley College for three years. A professor that taught in the philosophy department at Wellesley noticed Mary’s talent for teaching. This…...

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