The Impact of Jacksonian Democracy

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Submitted By breed22
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The Impact of Jacksonian Democracy When Andrew Jackson was elected president in 1828, the Democratic Party began to shape a new era. Unlike many presidents before him, he appealed to the masses, or the “common man”. The mission of the Jacksonian Democrats was to amplify the strength of the poor, and decrease the influence and power of the wealthy. Economically, the Jacksonian Democrats benefitted because during this time, transportation was beginning to improve, and therefore commerce was boosted. However, President Jackson was forced to deal with the issue of the National Bank, which he believed held too much power and control over national economy. He also was forced to handle other important issues such as slavery, westward expansion, and sectionalism, and many people would come to dislike him for his opinion on these topics. For these reasons, Jacksonian Democracy impacted politics, national economy, and the status of the Union in both positive and negative ways. Previous to 1828, most of the men who held a high office were wealthy, aristocratic men who were brought up by established parents. These men were always educated, usually having completed college. Jackson was only the second president to take office without a college education, and this is one of the reasons why he appealed so much to all kinds of people, particularly the middle and lower classes. Jackson’s inauguration changed the way people looked at the government. People came from all around to be a part of the inauguration. The masses really respected him because he acknowledged all people. Many were shocked at his inauguration when he, “…bowed again to the people—Yes, to the people, in all their majesty,”(Document A). After the ceremony, everyone was even invited to the White House to be a part of the celebration! By doing this, Jackson showed the people that they were valued…...

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