Parable of Sadhu

In: Business and Management

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The Parable of the Sadhu

Introduction: The Parable of the Sadhu is the story of a man, Bowen McCoy, who traversed the Himalaya Mountains on a business sabbatical program. On his journey he encounters a sadhu (an Indian holy man) who has passed out from exhaustion on the path. He checks the man’s pulse and gets the others in his group to help him out, and carries on. When he reached the top, the rest of his team caught up to him and informed him that they did not take the sadhu all the way down to the village, and are not sure whether he lived or died.
Dilemma:
Bowen’s decision was based on many factors. Some of these factors were personal, such as his own physical fatigue, his goal to reach the summit, and the fact that this opportunity was “once-in-a-lifetime” (Curtis, 156). Other factors included the fatigue of his fellow climbers, the danger of the pass, the advise of his team and, most importantly, the well being of the sadhu. While reading this article, I found Bowen’s decision to be mostly based on his own personal issues. Although he rationalized his decision later with his fears of the other members of the group’s heath and the fact that the pass may not be passable later, I had the feeling that deep down that’s not why he pushed ahead. I believe that he, somewhat selfishly, was only interested in finishing the climb for his own personal gain and for his ego. Evidence of this lies in his exhilaration of reaching the top, even an hour later when he sees Stephen, his friend, come struggling up the mountain. His rationale of his decision makes it seem like his team’s well being was a major concern, but he did not appear to be as concerned with Stephen’s health as he was with his own accomplishment.
Goals:
Bowen’s goal, like the goal of many of the members of the team, was to reach the summit, no matter what it took. He and much of the…...

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