Oxygen

In: Science

Submitted By joshuatimms2
Words 402
Pages 2
Q: What properties do your forms exhibit?
A: Oxygen is paramagnetic. I also support combustion. The liquid and solid of oxygen are pale blue. My gas is colorless, odorless, and tasteless.

Q: Any other important contributions?
A: Yes actually I do one very important one that my grandfather use to say “Without my life their no life for anything”.
Summary
In my interview with Oxygen, an element on the periodic table, I discovered that life is dependent on its existence. It is a non-metal. That it was discovered in 1772, and that excited oxygen is responsible for the bright red and yellow-green colors of the aurora.
Q: What properties do your forms exhibit?
A: Oxygen is paramagnetic. I also support combustion. The liquid and solid of oxygen are pale blue. My gas is colorless, odorless, and tasteless.

Q: Any other important contributions?
A: Yes actually I do one very important one that my grandfather use to say “Without my life their no life for anything”.
Summary
In my interview with Oxygen, an element on the periodic table, I discovered that life is dependent on its existence. It is a non-metal. That it was discovered in 1772, and that excited oxygen is responsible for the bright red and yellow-green colors of the aurora.
Introduction
3rd most abundant element in the universe. 21 % of the atmosphere is made up of Oxygen.
Q: When were you discovered?
A: Oxygen was first discovered by Carl Scheele, a pharmacist. He produced oxygen gas by heating mercuric oxide and various nitrates as early as 1772. He called the it “fire air” because it was the only known supporter of combustion.
Q: Interesting. Do you have any other uses?
A: The major commercial use of oxygen is in steel production.
Animals and plants use oxygen for respiration.
Introduction
3rd most abundant element in the universe. 21 % of the atmosphere is made up of Oxygen.…...

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