Normative Theory

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Normative theory

Media theory describes the relationship between media and society which is associated with complex social, political, economical and philosophical principles. A type of media theory termed as ‘Normative theory’ refers to what the media must be doing in a society rather what the media is actually doing. Generally, the central thoughts about obligations of mass communication will be constant with other principles and arrangements in a society. According to Siebert et.al, in their book ‘Four theories of the Press’, the press takes the responsibility of forms and coloration of political as well as social structures within the context in which it operates (1956, pp.1-2). The normative political model of media finds to interfere in the operations of media and restrain the inequality in the surrounding also enables the freedom and brings improvement in the access of public (Siebert et.al, 1956). The press and other media have their own view that reflects the law implemented in their society and runs it accordingly. Moreover, social solidarity, active participation, cohesion, cultural diversity and social responsibility are also concerned by the media. Every culture has its own principles, laws, regulations and priorities (Normative media theory, 2011).

There are different media theories which are being implemented by various countries and their localities depending on their own usage and requirements. These theories may include Authoritarian theory which says the whole media and any of the communication authority is under supervision of the ruling authority and is governed by the head if the state. This theory omits the right of freedom of expression. Secondly, free press theory describes the concept that media as well as every person in the society has a right to speak and may raise his voice to get their rights and make their work done.…...

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