Exxon Case Study

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ExxonMobil Case Study
ExxonMobil Corporation, the parent of Esso, Mobil and ExxonMobil companies, offers a wide range of products and services. The corporation provides a full product cycle, starting with geological exploration of John D. Rockefeller and ending with delivering oil-related products to corporate and individual consumers. The three principal markets Exxon Mobil Corporation serves are fuels, lubricants and specialties, and petrochemicals. With regard to the corporation’s fuel products and services, it delivers them using the business-to-business model across three key segments, Industrial and Wholesale, Aviation, and Marine. Exxon’s main business is discovering, producing, and selling oil and natural gas all over the world. By association with the Standard Oil Trust, in 1890 Congress passed the Sherman Antitrust Act to outlaw its monopoly. This Act allowed Exxon to merge in 1972 with Mobil to form Exxon Mobil. The story of ExxonMobil illustrates the importance of interactions between one large cooperation, governments, and society.
Exxon Mobil as a current cooperation has transcended from a miniature pawn in Rockefeller’s industry into one of the top suppliers in the worlds industry of oil. Although Rockefeller’s influence is buried in the passage of time, ExxonMobil’s actions remain consistent with his nature except for his philanthropy. The emphasis on cost control, efficiency, centralized organization, and suppression of competitors still occurs but to a certain extent. ExxonMobil’s corporate culture still reflects the values of Rockefeller as far as being fiercely competitive, profit-focused, and efficient. ExxonMobil faced major challenges in complex business, government, and social environments. In the business environment aspect, it is challenged by the rise of state-owned oil companies. As far as government it is restricted by laws and…...

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