Civil Wa

In: Other Topics

Submitted By rrizo
Words 4176
Pages 17
American Civil War The American Civil War is a very misunderstood war. It is known for the war that ended slavery. What most people don’t know is the war was not originally fought for the abolition of slavery. The South, or the Confederate, wanted to exercise their rights as states and split from the north. Well Abraham Lincoln thought that would be the downfall of the United States. The Civil War was fought to between the Union and the
Confederacy on the issue of splitting up the United States. The country was divided between two philosophies, either they thought the country could only survive and prosper as a whole, or they believed the south had the right to split from the union.
The country was divided between two different philosophies. The North believed if the South seceded from the North the country would crumble. While the South believed they had the right as states to separate themselves from the Union. (Malvasi)
Abraham Lincoln was the head of the Unions thinking. He had a great sense of political knowledge. He realized if the south did secede the Union wouldn’t stand a chance against attack because half of the country essentially would have been gone. Lincoln originally had no plans of abolishing slavery all his focus was on keeping the country together in one strong unit. (Malvasi) The South on the other hand felt they had been mistreated by the Union and were being taken advantage of. Soon the idea of secession came around and South Carolina was the first to make the threat. They were quickly followed by states like Georgia and Mississippi. They were in fact threatening to leave because they believed the Union wanted to abolish slavery. They thought the plan was to do so by admitting more free states than slave states so congress would be one sided. (The Civil
War) This however was not the Unions intention.…...

Similar Documents

The American Civil War Was an Irrepressible Conflict. Do You Agree?

...‘The American Civil War was an irrepressible conflict.’ Do you agree? The American Civil war is one of the most studied topics in American history. Yet still, a definitive answer cannot be found as to why the war broke out. Many of the interpretations can be grouped into two major schools of thought: the irrepressible conflict or the Blundering Generation. It was certainly true that the North and South were becoming increasingly different during this period. Slavery being the most fundamental of these, however there was also variances in the economies and culture. This would support the idea that the war was inevitable as the differences were too great. However, it can be argued that radically different societies can co-exist without going to war. Instead, a series of mistakes and misjudgements were made by blundering politicians. There are numerous examples of this; the Kansas-Nebraska Act, Dred Scott and the Fugitive Slave Act to name just a few. In my view, the American Civil War was an irrepressible conflict since compromise on the slavery issue was impossible. Blundering politicians acted as catalysts to ignite the flames of war, however they did not create the differences which acted as the foundation for the irrepressible conflict. The issue of slavery is often cited as the most significant cause of the war. By 1860 the issue of slavery had become too great and compromise was impossible. As Frederick Douglass stated, ‘the more the issue is settled, the more it needs......

Words: 2087 - Pages: 9

Why Slavery Was Not the Cause of the Civil War

...During the mid- nineteenth century, the United States was being faced with a period of exponential growth; a distinct foundational social, economical and cultural difference resided between the country’s northern and southern regions. The North emerged as the industrial heart of the country’s economy, its region made up of manufacturing, developing and processing materials. The north was overall a stronger better-established economy. The South’s economy was made up of mostly agriculture based on large-scale farming. It eventually turned into an economy depended on cotton and required mass labor forces known as slaves, which was the backbone of its economy. As time went on the South began to feel more and more greatly threatened by the North. The South began to become dismayed with the lack of acknowledgement concerning federal control over state rights. Many southern states felt that the new constitution did not fully acknowledge if at all the rights of states to act independently. This was an exponential concern with right of slavery. As America began to expand with the addition of new states from the Louisiana Purchase and the victory of the Mexican War, the fight arose between slave and non-slave state proponents. The Missouri Compromise, Compromise of 1850, and Kansas- Nebraska Act of 1854 were all based around the use or freedom of slaves in new territories causing rising tensions between the North and South. The growth of the Abolition movement twisted the......

Words: 3475 - Pages: 14

How Important Was the Contribution of Martin Luther King to the Civil Rights Movement of the Years 1955-68?

...How important was the contribution of Martin Luther King to the civil rights movement of the years 1955-68? Martin Luther King was born on the 15th of January 1929. His father was a minister and all throughout king’s younger year’s king aspired to be just like his dad. King became pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, when he was twenty-five years old, in 1954. It wasn’t till a year later in 1955 that his involvement in the civil rights movement truly came into action. He had heard of a bus boycott, taking place in Montgomery; a young lad called Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man, she was arrested and fined. There was then staged a boycott, it lasted for 385 days; the situation became so tense king’s house was even bombed, and he was arrested. Because of his extreme involvement this was the start of people viewing king as this national figure for civil rights. Some people do argue however king’s involvement to the cause was not that important, and it was more the action of the people and the long overdue action from the government that made the biggest contribution. The Boycott was most successful for both king and the civil rights movement; In December 1956 the court outlawed segregation on buses. This showed how much the public made an impact on protects, and showed how much king was a key figure in its achievement. After that in 1957 King and several other important activists including Ralph Abernathy, Fred......

Words: 1043 - Pages: 5

To What Extent Was the Red Victory in the Civil War Due to the Skill and Leadership of Trotsky?

...To What Extent Was the Red Victory in the Civil War Due to the Skill and Leadership of Trotsky? The red victory in the civil war in 1919 may have been due to the skill and leadership of Trotsky who was the founder and first leader of the Red Army. As well as this there were other factors which contributed such as geographical factors, the unity and organisation of the reds and the support that they had. The reds were victorious in the civil war due to the skill and leadership of Trotsky who had been made commissar for war in 1918. He restored harsh military discipline and professionalism to the ‘worker’s and peasants red army’ by reintroducing the death penalty for those who did wrong which meant that men were made to fight as more of an effective fighting force. He also reorganised the army and so it had a strict hierarchy and he brought back thousands of former Tsarist officers to train and command the units. To do this he held their families hostage which meant that their loyalty was ensured. In addition to this he attached a political commissar to each army of the unit and ended soldiers committee’s and officer’s elections which meant that the loyalty of the officers was ensured so he would retain power, For those men who were unable to fight, due to age or physical inability, formed labour battalions. This meant that the Front received more help and nobody had an excuse to not fight in the army and so it would prevent people from thinking they could use injuries to......

Words: 1166 - Pages: 5

Explain Why Manchuria Was the Main Battleground of the Chinese Civil War in the Years 1946–1948.

...Explain why Manchuria was the main battleground of the Chinese civil war in the years 1946–1948. The long-term factor that made Manchuria the main battleground in the beginning of the Civil War was its economic importance. Not only was Manchuria the industrial centre of China at the time, it was a strategic trade zone because of its infrastructure. Manchuria had some of the key railway lines connecting the region with a number of areas in China. Its economic importance was highlighted by the Japanese invasion in 1931, when they had chosen the region seeking for natural resources such as coal. Thus the region had proven to be economically beneficial for both sides, which one of the main reasons it was chosen to be the main battleground at the early stages of the war between the GMD and CPC. The fundamental reason for Manchuria being the key battleground between 1946 and 1948 however was the power vacuum created by Japanese surrender in August 1945. After a sudden retreat of Japanese troops, both the Nationalists and the Communists were determined to seize the abandoned territory, which is why both sent their troops to Manchuria as soon as Japanese had surrendered. The reason why it had been so essential for either side to take control of Manchuria was that seizing Manchuria would considerably strengthened the chances of either GMD or CPC to take over China. Therefore it was crucial to get control over Manchuria in order to have greater control over the whole of China. ...

Words: 966 - Pages: 4

How Important Was the Contribution of Martin Luther King to the Civil Rights Movement in the Years 1955-68?

...How important was the contribution of Martin Luther King to the civil rights movement in the years 1955-68? The civil rights movement was aimed to give African Americans Social, Political and Economic equality after President Abraham Lincoln declared the freedom of all American slaves in 1862 Emancipation Proclamation and the thirteenth amendment was passed to the American constitution which announced slavery illegal. Despite the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments being passed to the US constitution they were never fully enforced since there was segregation in housing, voting, and education. Was Martin Luther Kings contribution to the civil rights movement the most significant in achieving equality for African Americans between 1955-68, or were other factors such as the Vietnam war, increasing political activists like Malcolm X and changes in the political climate as important? Gandhi’s peaceful protest methods was a big inspiration to Martin Luther King as this was also his main and only method of protest, he showed this in the Montgomery bus boycott since he highlighted the injustice of segregation on interstate buses in America only by persuading black people to boycott the buses. This protest lasted 13 months and was one of Martin Luther Kings most prominent role as a civil rights leader. The NAACP which turned to long standing member Rosa Parks to take action by challenging segregation on the Montgomery buses. When Rosa parks was arrested and fined $14 Martin......

Words: 659 - Pages: 3

How Successful Was Martin Luther King’s Campaign for Civil Rights in the Years 1955-1968?

...How successful was Martin Luther King’s campaign for civil rights in the years 1955-1968? During this time period, Martin Luther King had many successes and failures in his campaign for civil rights. King played an iconic role in all the work he did for African Americans, his achievements for the Black people were outstanding. On the other hand there are ideas that contradict his greatness on making such an impact to civil rights. We are able measure MLK’s achievements, by analysing how successful he was with his campaigns. Success can be given upon by the result of the predicted outcome compared to the true outcome. In this case it’s whether King’s ambitions for the movement came to be achieved or if his campaigns failed. For this we shall be studying his achievements and failures in the civil rights movement between 1955 and 1968. You can also look at how much awareness of the campaign was made to America, along with this the consequences of the campaigns and what resulted after them. You can use all of these criteria to judge how successful MLK was. King’s first major involvement of leading a campaign started on the 1st of December 1955, when Rosa Parks was arrested for not giving up a seat on a bus in Montgomery Alabama. This was when King was first recognised as being a strong leader in gaining equality for African Americans, along with the backing of the church. The result of Rosa Park’s arrest became the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which was run by MLK, the NAACP,...

Words: 3394 - Pages: 14

Civil

...Rivera 1 Mrs. Smith Extra Credit 8 May, 2014 The Civil War During the summer of 18 61, Willmar McClain decided to move his family to Appomattox, courthouse from harms away. In 1865, Lee surrendered his army of northern Virginia to Grant in the front yard of the courthouse and on that day.. The civil war was fought in ten thousand places. More than 3 million Americans fought in the civil war and as a result over six hundred thousand men died. The war consisted of Four years(1861-1865) of brutal battle between Americans. The war began mainly over a dispute between the northerners and the southerners about the southerners not willing to make change of dismissing slavery. The northern state army were called the Union while the southerners were called the Confederates. In 1860, Abraham Lincoln was the president of the united states at the time. Lincoln won the presidency with only 40% of the vote George McClellan was the general for the Union side and Ulysses S. Grant was the general for the Confederate side. During the war, there were many people who took it upon themselves to justify their beliefs by killing their opposing side. For example, the radical abolitionist John Brown thought he was gods agent on earth. Him and his sons hacked 5 pro-slavery men to death with swords. In 1865, The Union were simply outnumbered compared to the confederates. The union lack the amount of soldiers, the necessary utilities needed to survive, weapons, ammo ect. and even......

Words: 265 - Pages: 2

Was Korea a Turning Point in the Civil War?

...Was the Korean War a turning point in the Civil War? The Korean War was thus a turning point in the development of the Cold War in that it marked a shift in the focal point in the development of tensions, from Europe to East Asia, with many indirect conflicts being largely confined to Europe. The Korean War was the first time that communism and capitalism were to fight against each other. It was hence a turning point in the development of the Cold War — instead of tensions developing between the two countries directly, the conflicts are now manifested through a proxy, which is Korea. This not only altered the field of rivalry between the two superpowers from Europe to Asia, but also changed the method through which the two powers conflicted. While the Cold War in Europe was "fought" mainly through all means short of direct armed confrontation, the Korean War saw the escalation of the conflict to a "hot war”. The idea of puppet states emphasized that the Korean War conflict was merely the Cold War fought on another front, with USSR and USA in control. It is also evident that the two superpowers were control in Korea. The US manipulated the United Nations (which was a first real test) so as to send a mostly American force into the region to address its strategic goals of preventing a possible domino effect and executing NSC-68. Stalin’s limited aid and lack of restraint against Kim also led to the prolonging of the war, but could also be seen as Stalin being hesitant to......

Words: 707 - Pages: 3

How Far Was the Effectiveness of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s Limited by Internal Divisions? (30 Marks)

...How far was the effectiveness of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s limited by internal divisions? (30 marks) During the Civil Rights Movement great improvements were made gradually for the small minority groups in USA, for example Black African Americans, Hispanic groups and also women. However, from the very beginning there were internal divisions within the civil rights movement as well as external divisions. These partitions were caused by four major factors; methods such as peaceful protest and violence, ideology, effects of tension from jealousy and rivalry and lastly personalities of the different civil rights organisations and their leaders as they were competing for media attention and public recognition. These divisions did limit the effectiveness of the civil rights movement as they slowed down the process and cause many complications. These divisions were extremely clear thought out the 1960s as there was the development of Black Power and their methods of violence which is a contrast to Martin Luther King’s approach which was peaceful protest. In the early 1960s many successes came about for the civil rights movement especially for SNCC and of Martin Luther King. The Greensboro sit-ins led by SNCC in 1960 is an example of a triumph as they demonstrated that civil rights campaigns could spread quickly and also showed that other organisations could work together as the sit-ins attacked all aspects of segregation and it lead to the extending of the existing......

Words: 913 - Pages: 4

How Far Was Peaceful Protest Responsible for the Successes of Civil Rights Movement During the Years 1955-1964

...there was a significant change in the progress of racial equality and it is clear that peaceful protest was a direct cause of the change. Earlier protests did things such as raising awareness, making smaller changes to state laws and showing that blacks had power without using violence. Later and bigger protests such as the March of Washington made bigger changes such as pushing towards the Civil Rights Bill. During the late 1950s and early 1960s the main forms of peaceful protest were the sit- ins, freedoms rides and Montgomery Bus Boycott in. The sit-ins in 1960 were important to the civil rights movement because they raised a lot of awareness when they spread to 54 cities in 9 states in just 2 months. They were also important because they showed that despite the fact the black protestors were not being violent, white racists would still react violently. The Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1956 was significant because it showed the effect that black Americans can have economically and also the power they could have without using violence. The violence black people involved in the boycott received from white southern racists showed their determined racism. The bus boycott raised more northern support and inspired boycotts in other cities and caused the buses to be desegregated, however the rest of the city remained segregated. The Freedom Rides in May 1961 was another non-violent protest that was greeted with violence from racists. The Freedom Rides were significant to the civil......

Words: 894 - Pages: 4

How Important Was the Contribution of Martin Luther King to the Civil Rights Movement of the Years 1955-68?

...How important was the contribution of Martin Luther King to the civil rights movement of the years 1955-68? Martin Luther King was born on the 15th of January 1929. His father was a minister and all throughout king’s younger year’s king aspired to be just like his dad. King became pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, when he was twenty-five years old, in 1954. It wasn’t till a year later in 1955 that his involvement in the civil rights movement truly came into action. He had heard of a bus boycott, taking place in Montgomery; a young lad called Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man, she was arrested and fined. There was then staged a boycott, it lasted for 385 days; the situation became so tense king’s house was even bombed, and he was arrested. Because of his extreme involvement this was the start of people viewing king as this national figure for civil rights. Some people do argue however king’s involvement to the cause was not that important, and it was more the action of the people and the long overdue action from the government that made the biggest contribution. The Boycott was most successful for both king and the civil rights movement; In December 1956 the court outlawed segregation on buses. This showed how much the public made an impact on protects, and showed how much king was a key figure in its achievement. After that in 1957 King and several other important activists including Ralph Abernathy, Fred Shuttlesworth,...

Words: 344 - Pages: 2

How Effective Was Opposition to Civil Rights During the Period 1955-1968?

...How effective was opposition to civil rights during the period 1955-1968? The civil rights movement had gained a lot of opposition during the campaign, however some opposition was more effective than others. There were various sources of opposition such as; the rise in black power movement, Federal opposition, State and local government opposition and the public opinion. Firstly, Federal opposition was effective at hindering the civil rights campaign because Eisenhower and JFK had hindered the campaign significantly. Eisenhower was afraid to give african americans power as he believed they would do more harm than good because they would cause resentment among americas white population. JFK also hindered the campaign by persuading campaigns to stop using violence and use peaceful protest, Kennedy knew that this would hinder the african americans campaign as Kennedy knows they will have less power and conviction in their civil rights campaign. However federal opposition wasn't that effective because the congress was in full support of the civil rights act of 1964 and the voting rights act of 196, this enabled the campaigners and the government to force desegregation laws and support voter registration. Therefore the federal opposition was effective at hindering the civil rights movement because the presidents were able to hinder the civil rights movement, while the congress managed to support it, overall the federal opposition had hindered the civil rights movement more......

Words: 739 - Pages: 3

There Was There Was There Was

...There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there was there was There was there......

Words: 414 - Pages: 2

To What Extent Was the Civil War a War over Slavery

...“To what extent was the Civil War a war over slavery?”    In this enlightened age, there are few I believe, but what will acknowledge, that slavery  as an institution, is a moral and political evil in any Country.  Robert E. Lee      620 thousand of ​ soldiers lost their lives,​  war cost 5 billion dollars, large  destructions, especially in the South. 4 million freed slaves by Thirteenth Amendment to  the United States Constitution. Brother shot to brother.  Slavery in America has its origins from the beginning of United States existence.  In nineteenth century U.S could be called as an young country with wide, noble ideas of  independence, equality and economic development; with their own basic law, the first  constitution in the World. Regarding to mentioned words; why was it possible to  America to start Civil War?  The case of America was multi­dimensional. United States Constitution did not explain  laws and behaviour towards black­skinned slaves clearly. The South States of America  were place where slavery flourished. Hosts of latifundiums needed ''hands to work'' –  slaves were the cheapest solution because hosts after buying a slave with reasonabe  price had to care only of the fact that their slave is still alive; they provided slaves with  hunger food rations and water – it was a cheap labour which made large land holdings  profitable. In general opinion this unhumanitarian situation was the reason of Civil War.  But...  Was it that clear?......

Words: 1544 - Pages: 7