Bureaucratic Control

In: Business and Management

Submitted By melissatphan
Words 2641
Pages 11
Chapter 1: What is Management?

1. Describe what management is.
Management is getting work done through others with the use of effectiveness as well as efficiency. Managers have to be concerned with the efficiency and effectiveness in the work process.
Effectiveness is accomplishing tasks that help fulfill organizational objectives such as customer service and satisfaction.
Efficiency is getting work done with a minimum of effort, expense or waste.

2. Explain the four functions of management.
Managers will serve their company well when they plan, lead, organize and control. Managements who perform these four managerial functions are well more successful.
Planning is determining the organizational goals and a desire to achieve them. It is a good way to improve a company’s performance because it encourages people to work hard for extended periods, engage in behaviours directly related to goal accomplishment, and think of better ways to do their jobs.
Organizing is deciding where decisions are made, who will do what jobs and tasks, and who will work for whom in the company.
Leading involves in inspiring and motivating workers to work hard and try their best to achieve organizational goals.
Controlling is monitoring progress toward goal achievement and taking corrective action when needed. The basic control involves in setting standards to achieve goals, comparing actual performance to those standards, and then making changes to performance to those standards.

3. Describe the different kinds of managers.
There are different kinds of managers that include top managers, middle managers, first-line managers and then team leaders.
Top managers are people who are CEO, COO, CFO or CIO.
- They are responsible for the overall direction of the organisation.
- They are responsible for creating a context for change. They need to be quick in changes…...

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