Brand Failure

In: Business and Management

Submitted By arbind
Words 77111
Pages 309
Brand Failures

Matt Haig

Kogan Page

Brand Failures

Praise for Brand Failures. . .
“You learn more from failure than you can from success. Matt Haig’s new book is a goldmine of helpful how-not-to advice, which you ignore at your own peril.”
Laura Ries, President, Ries & Ries, marketing strategists, and bestselling co-author of The
Fall of Advertising and the Rise of PR and The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding
“Every marketer will read this with both pleasure and profit. But the lessons are deadly serious, back to basics: real consumer benefits, value, execution. Read it, enjoy it, learn from it.”
Patrick Barwise, Professor of Management and Marketing, London Business School
“Business books that manage to grab your attention, entertain you, and provide you with great advice, all at the same time, should be read immediately. This is one of those books. If you want to avoid being in the next edition of this book, you had better read it.”
Peter Cheverton, CEO, Insight Marketing & People, and author of Key Marketing Skills
“I thought the book was terrific. Brings together the business lessons from all the infamous brand disasters from the Ford Edsel and New Coke to today’s Andersen and Enron. A must-buy for marketers.”
Peter Doyle, Professor of Marketing & Strategic Management, Warwick Business School,
University of Warwick
“Brand Failures is a treasure trove of information and insights. I’ll be consulting it regularly! ”
Sicco van Gelder, CEO, Brand-Meta consultancy, and author of Global Brand Strategy
“Matt Haig is to be congratulated on compiling a comprehensive and compelling collection of
100 cases of failures attributable to misunderstanding or misapplication of brand strategy.
Mark and learn.”
Michael J Taylor, Emeritus Professor of Marketing, University of Strathclyde, President,
Academy of Marketing
“The history of consumer marketing is littered with failed…...

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