Achondroplasia

In: Science

Submitted By Ricecake
Words 301
Pages 2
1st Hour
12-4-15
Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis

In my Photosynthesis Lab my group changed the amount of light intensity by increasing the amount of Light Bulbs used (2 per cup), making it Qualitative. By increasing the amount of light bulbs we noticed that the leaf disks floated to the top of the water 2 times as fast. The leaf disks floated to the top because the water put little pockets of CO2 and Oxygen and us putting more light bulbs the Oxygen and CO2 were being ¨put into” the leaf disks faster.

In our Cellular Respiration Lab we first had to fill a plastic cup with water and put a thermometer in the water. Then we prepared the respirometers by putting ½ a cotton ball in each and push them down with a glass tube. Then we put in .5 mL of 15% of potassium hydroxide. Then we put 10 germinating mung beans in one respirometer and then 10 ¨controlled¨ corn kernels in the other. Then the respirometers were put into the water and we waited for it to ¨equalize¨. Then we added red manometer fluid to the tip of each tube. Then we waited to check how far the fluid traveled every 10 minutes until it entered the chamber. The initial temperature reading was 25 degrees C. If I could have changed something in this lab I would have increased the amount of corn and mung beans to see if it would increase the speed of the red manometer fluid.

From these 2 labs I learned that water during the Photosynthesis process can add Oxygen and CO2 into a leaf. I also learned that given more light intensity you can increase the speed of Photosynthesis. And even in a closed system water can still affect Cellular…...

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